Friday, December 16, 2011

First ASARECA General Assembly


AfricaRice participated in the exhibition showcasing agricultural research, extension, education, training and development work under the theme ‘Feeding Our Region in the 21st Century’ as part of the First General Assembly of the Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA) held in Entebbe, Uganda, 14–16 December.

Over 350 agricultural researchers from across the globe, as well as ministers from the 10 ASARECA member countries (Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda) attended the Assembly, which called for greater cooperation among research, training, extension services and the private sector within countries and across the sub-region.

The Assembly’s recommendations included the needs to:
• Support farmers and their associations
• Strengthen extension
• Support NGOs
• Support the private sector and its strategic partners
• Address emerging issues underlying food insecurity in the ASARECA region and the role of agriculture in  overall regional transformation
• Mainstream universities

Workshop on National and Regional Variety Catalogs


A workshop on ‘Varietal release and national and regional variety catalogs’ was held, 15–16 December, in Cotonou, to raise awareness of rice breeders involved in the Africa Rice Breeding Task Force on issues relating to variety testing, characterization, releases, cataloguing and maintenance; breeder/foundation seed production; and harmonization of descriptors. Presentations on the current status of variety release and regional and national catalogs were made by AfricaRice, the Institut du Sahel (INSAH)/ Comité permanent Inter-État pour la Lutte contre la Sécheresse dans le Sahel (CILSS), UEMOA and CORAF/WECARD.

The participants noted that a major effort has been made in West Africa regarding the harmonization of regulations relating to variety release and seed certification over the past few years. The document was adopted by ECOWAS in 2008 and by UEMOA in 2009. At the end of the workshop detailed action plans were made for greater harmonization.

Data collection and analysis training course


A training course on ‘Data collection and analysis’ was organized in collaboration with national programs participating in the Africa Rice Breeding Task Force, 12–16 December, in Cotonou, to help rice researchers adopt good principles of data collection and management, improve the quality and quantity of their research publications and conduct statistical analyses. The course targeted scientific staff involved in the design of experiments or the collection, analysis and interpretation of data from designed experiments in the Breeding Task Force.

First ASARECA General Assembly


AfricaRice participated in the exhibition showcasing agricultural research, extension, education, training and development work under the theme ‘Feeding Our Region in the 21st Century’ as part of the First General Assembly of the Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA) held in Entebbe, Uganda, 14–16 December.

Over 350 agricultural researchers from across the globe, as well as ministers from the 10 ASARECA member countries (Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda) attended the Assembly, which called for greater cooperation among research, training, extension services and the private sector within countries and across the sub-region.

The Assembly’s recommendations included the needs to:
  • Support farmers and their associations
  • Strengthen extension
  • Support NGOs
  • Support the private sector and its strategic partners
  • Address emerging issues underlying food insecurity in the ASARECA region and the role of agriculture in overall regional transformation
  • Mainstream universities in the research and development system. 

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Improving rice postharvest handling, marketing and development of new rice-based products


The inaugural meeting of the Project Steering Committee of the CIDA-funded project on ‘Enhancing food security in Africa through the improvement of rice post-harvest handling, marketing and the development of new rice-based products’ was held in Cotonou on 15 December.

The meeting was attended by 14 participants representing CIDA, AfricaRice, the Commission de la communauté économique et monétaire de l'Afrique centrale (CEMAC), ECOWAS (represented by UEMOA), McGill University, the national project coordinators from Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal and Uganda. The progress made in 2011 in the project implementation and the Project Implementation Plan (PIP) were reviewed and the work plan and budget for 2012 discussed.

Youth Employment Program in Mali


Youth Employment Program in Mali In view of AfricaRice’s new emphasis on improved postharvest technologies, which will help open up opportunities for local households to raise their incomes by promoting the development of new rice-based products, the Center was invited by  the Government of Mali to showcase its work at the country’s National Youth Employment Program 13–15 December.

The President of Mali inaugurated the event in the presence of several members of the government and representatives from R&D institutions and youth organizations. He promised to give priority to the development of small enterprises and to facilitate youths’ access to credit. After the inaugural ceremony, the President visited the exhibition set up as part of the Youth Employment Program.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Training course in grain quality evaluation


A basic course in rice grain quality evaluation was conducted from 7 to 9 December for English-speaking countries and from 12 to 14 December for French-speaking countries in Cotonou. Participants from 12 countries involved in the STRASA project attended. The course, which included both theory and practical sessions, offered an opportunity for the participants to learn about the basics of assessing the quality of rice grain and preferences for grain quality in their respective countries, and to evaluate the grain quality of rice samples brought from their respective countries.


Monday, December 12, 2011

The case for an affordable locally adapted combine-harvester


Harvesting and threshing of paddy are serious bottlenecks for rice farmers. Large combine-harvesters are ill adapted to the rice fields of smallholders. Consequently, paddy may sit in the field for weeks or even months waiting to be harvested or threshed, during which time its quality deteriorates because of exposure to the elements.

As a result, many rice farmers resort to manual harvesting and threshing operations, which are time-consuming and affect the quality of the paddy. Delayed removal of paddy from the farm impinges upon the second season, jeopardizing the option for a profitable second crop.

AfricaRice is introducing and adapting a small affordable combine-harvester in the Senegal River valley, to enable timely harvesting and threshing. This could provide the incentive for farmers to sell their paddy quickly and focus on producing a second crop (either rice or a horticultural crop such as tomato, potato or green bean).

The early removal of paddy from the farm would not only enable farmers to focus on their core farming business (i.e. crop production), but would also open up the prospect for greater aggregation of the marketable surplus of paddy.

Fragmentation of available marketable volume of paddy — that is, the fact that producers act alone in processing and selling their surplus paddy — is a major disincentive to private-sector investment in the domestic rice value chain.

Le cas d’une moissonneuse-batteuse adaptée et accessible localement

La récolte et le battage du paddy constituent de sérieuses contraintes pour les riziculteurs. Les grandes moissonneuses-batteuses sont inadaptées aux petites exploitations des paysans. Par conséquent, le paddy peut rester au champ pendant des semaines avant d’être récolté ou battu, pendant ce temps sa qualité se détériore du fait de l’exposition aux aléas climatiques.

Ainsi, de nombreux producteurs ont recours aux longues opérations de récoltes et de battages manuels, qui affectent la qualité du paddy. La récolte tardive du paddy dans les exploitations empiète sur la seconde campagne, empêchant l’option d’une seconde culture rentable.

AfricaRice est en train d’introduire et d’adapter une mini moissonneuse-batteuse accessible dans la vallée du fleuve Sénégal pour permettre la récolte et le battage à temps opportun. Cela inciterait les producteurs à vendre rapidement leur paddy et à se focaliser sur la production d’une seconde culture (le riz ou une culture maraîchère telle que la tomate, la pomme de terre ou les haricots verts).

La récolte rapide du paddy dans les champs permettra aux paysans non seulement de se focaliser sur la production agricole (c.-à-d. culture), mais aussi d’ouvrir la voie à une commercialisation à grande échelle de grandes quantités de riz. La fragmentation de la commercialisation du paddy découlant du fait que les producteurs assurent seuls la transformation et la vente de leur excédent de paddy – constitue une contrainte majeure qui dissuade l’investissement du secteur privé dans la chaîne de valeur du riz local.

Mise en place des Groupes d’action à l’échelle du continent africain en vue d’accélérer la livraison de technologies rizicoles

Les experts riz nationaux et internationaux d’Afrique se sont réunis pour mettre en place des Groupes d’action à l’échelle du continent dans les domaines thématiques importants du secteur rizicole en vue de stimuler la livraison de technologies améliorées.


Se focalisant sur cinq thèmes – (1) sélection, (2) agronomie, (3) post-récolte & valorisation, (4) politique, et (5) genre – les Groupes d’action riz d’Afrique visent à fournir une synergie aux efforts de recherche à travers le continent, à mettre en commun les rares ressources humaines et à encourager l’implication nationale au niveau élevé.


« Cette approche permettra de réduire le délais entre le développement et l’homologation de nouvelles technologies rizicoles à travers le continent et d’augmenter leur impact, » a fait remarquer Dr Papa Abdoulaye Seck, Directeur général du Centre du riz pour l’Afrique (AfricaRice).


Dr Seck a expliqué que le mécanisme des Groupes d’action est basé sur trois principes : durabilité, développement d’une masse critique et appropriation par les systèmes nationaux de recherche agricole. « Le renforcement de la capacité en matière de recherche rizicole aux niveaux régional et national est l’objectif central des Groupes d’action. »


AfricaRice anime ces Groupes d’action continentaux en réponse à la forte demande faite par les participants du 2nd Congrès du riz en Afrique organisé en 2010, demande qui a été approuvée par la 28e Session ordinaire du Conseil des ministres en 2011.


Pour AfricaRice et ses partenaires, le mécanisme du Groupe d’action est un outil important permettant, d’une part d’établir un lien entre le développement des technologies rizicoles améliorées et les partenaires locaux par le biais de la recherche d’adaptation, et d’autre part d’accélérer leur dissémination à travers des partenariats novateurs.


Le Centre va s’appuyer sur son expertise dans le mécanisme du Groupe d’action au niveau régional introduit dans les années 1990, et qui avait été apprécié par ses partenaires nationaux.


Les nouveaux groupes d’action vont opérer sous l’égide du Partenariat mondial de la science rizicole (GRiSP), un programme de recherche du GCRAI, qui est une nouvelle plateforme de partenariat unique pour la recherche rizicole pour le développement (R4D) visant un plus grand impact.


« Nous devons veiller à ce que les Groupes d’action servent d’espace vital pour que les jeunes chercheurs puissent y évoluer, » a déclaré Dr Marco Wopereis, Directeur général adjoint d’AfricaRice, lors du lancement des Groupes d’action riz d’Afrique sur l’agronomie et la post-récolte & la valorisation qui a eu lieu récemment à Cotonou, Bénin, et auquel ont pris part les participants de 14 pays africains.


Plus tôt cette année, le Groupe d’action genre sur le riz en Afrique a été lancé en vue d’assurer une intégration effective du genre dans les activités de recherche pour le développement et de renforcement des capacités en vue de livrer des technologies respectueuses du genre qui puissent améliorer la qualité et la compétitivité du riz produit localement.


Le Groupe d’action Sélection et amélioration variétale du riz en Afrique est déjà opérationnel et facilite l’accès des jeunes sélectionneurs riz du continent aux nouvelles variétés et lignées. Il est également activement engagé dans l’organisation des programmes de formation sur la sélection, le dispositif expérimental et la gestion des bases de données du matériel génétique pour les chercheurs nationaux.

Friday, December 9, 2011

Training on experimental auctions held in Kampala


A training course on experimental auctions, financed by CIDA, was organized by AfricaRice and the National Crops Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI) Cereals Program of the National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO) in Kampala, Uganda from 4 to 9 December. One facilitator and eight trainees from eight organizations were trained. The trainees came from organizations in Cameroon, Gambia, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Uganda. The training was unique in that it combined theoretical lectures with practical sessions — a series of real experimental auctions was conducted, which participants organized. The auctions aimed at eliciting urban Ugandan consumers’ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for alternative NERICA rice varieties and the determinants of WTP. This was the first training of its kind on experimental auctions in Africa and was a big success. 

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Enhancing smallholder access to improved rice technologies in West and Central Africa


The phase 1 of the IFAD-funded project ‘Enhancing Smallholder Access to NERICA for Alleviating Rural Poverty in West and Central Africa’ came to an end in December after 4 years of activities. A final workshop was held, 6–8 December, in Cotonou, to enable the regional project coordinator and national project coordinators from Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea and Sierra Leone to discuss the project’s achievements and challenges. The participants explored the way forward in order to ensure the sustainability of the results achieved in phase 1, highlighting the need for facilitating market access for seed and grain producers, promotion of value addition for income generation, and strengthening stakeholders’ capacities in seed production, marketing and enterprise development. The main recommendation was to move from a seed-production focus that was dominant in phase 1 to a rice value-chain focus in phase 2.

Thursday, December 1, 2011

African Development Bank meeting


On behalf of AfricaRice, DDG Marco Wopereis participated in a meeting with the Operations and Development Effectiveness Committee (CODE) of the Board of AfDB in Tunis, Tunisia, on 1 December, to answer questions regarding the SARD-SC project. About 20 members of the board attended. Also present in this meeting were: Monty P. Jones (FARA), Jonathan Wadsworth (Fund Office), Lystra Antoine (Fund Office), Nteranya Sanginga (IITA), Mohamed El-Mourid (ICRISAT), Dougou Keita, Jonas Chianu (AfDB) and Bouchaib Boulanouar (AfDB). It is expected that the proposal will be submitted for approval to the full board of AfDB in December 2011.

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Workshop on sawah technology for sub-Saharan Africa


A workshop, entitled ‘Improving and sustaining rice production under changing climatic conditions’, was organized, 22–24 November, in Kumasi, Ghana, to showcase the principles and practices of the sawah technology. The technology was developed by Prof. Toshiyuki Wakatsuki of the Kinki University, Japan, to improve soil and water management, irrigation and fertilizer efficiency to increase rice productivity in African lowlands.

The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) with technical and financial support from the Kinki University, Japan, JIRCAS and AfricaRice. It brought together participants from Japan, Ghana, Indonesia, Nigeria and Senegal.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

AfricaRice Scientist wins 2011 Japan International Award for Young Researchers

Dr. Jonne Rodenburg, Agronomist with special focus on weed science at the Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) has won the 2011 Japan International Award for Young Agricultural Researchers for spearheading the development of integrated weed management strategies for resource-poor rice farmers in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

The Japan International Award for Young Agricultural Researchers recognizes outstanding performance and research achievements in agriculture, forestry, fisheries and related industries in developing countries.

Dr. Rodenburg, who is a Dutch national, is among the three recipients of this year’s award, which was presented recently in Tsukuba City, Japan, by Dr. Eitarou Miwa, Chairman of the Japan Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Research Council (AFFRC) in the presence of Dr. Masa Iwanaga, President of the Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS).

“It is the second time our young researchers have won this prestigious award. We are proud of them and honored by the recognition they have received from Japan for their work,” said AfricaRice Director General Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck.

In collaboration with national and international research partners, Dr. Rodenburg has identified effective (genetic) mechanisms to achieve resistance against the most important parasitic weeds in rain-fed rice systems and a number of highly resistant and tolerant varieties for immediate use in farmers’ fields. He has also identified varieties with good weed competitiveness that can be recommended for use by farmers.

 “The results of his research on resistance of rice varieties to parasitic weeds will be very useful for rice breeding programs,” said Dr. Marco Wopereis, AfricaRice Deputy Director General, Research for Development.  “If resource-poor farmers can fight against such weeds through their choice of seed – that would be a major breakthrough because to date only crop management approaches are available to combat these weeds.”

According to AfricaRice experts, the losses in rice production in SSA due to weeds equate to half the current rice imports in the region and smallholder farmers have a limited range of effective and affordable weed management technologies.

Dr. Rodenburg supervises many MSc and PhD students from a wide range of nationalities and has built up a large network of research partners around the globe and within Africa. He is a prolific scientist and also contributes to the generation of farmer training material such as videos, radio-scripts and technical information sheets.

Un chercheur d’AfricaRice remporte le prix international japonais 2011 des jeunes chercheurs

Dr Jonne Rodenburg, malherbologue au Centre du riz pour l’Afrique (AfricaRice), a remporté le Prix international japonais des jeunes chercheurs agricoles pour avoir contribué au développement de stratégies intégrées de gestion des adventices pour les riziculteurs pauvres d’Afrique subsaharienne (ASS).

Le prix international japonais des jeunes chercheurs agricoles récompense des performances exceptionnelles et des réalisations dans les domaines de la recherche agricole, de la foresterie, de la pêche et des industries connexes dans les pays en voie de développement.

Dr Rodenburg qui est citoyen hollandais, est l’un des trois récipiendaires du prix de cette année, qui a été décerné récemment à Tsukuba City, Japon par Dr Eitarou Miwa, président du Conseil Japonais pour l’Agriculture, la Foresterie, la Pêche et la Recherche (AFFRC) en présence de Dr Masa Iwanaga, Président du Centre japonais de la recherche international pour les sciences agricoles (JIRCAS).

« C’est la seconde fois qu’un de nos jeunes chercheurs remporte ce prix prestigieux. Nous sommes fiers d’eux et sommes honorés par la reconnaissance du Japon pour leurs travaux », a affirmé Dr Papa Abdoulaye Seck, Directeur général d’AfricaRice.

En collaboration avec les partenaires de la recherche nationale et internationale, Dr Rodenburg a identifié des mécanismes (génétiques) efficaces de la résistance aux adventices parasites les plus nocifs dans les systèmes rizicoles pluviaux, et un nombre de variétés résistantes et tolérantes immédiatement exploitables dans les champs des producteurs. Il a également identifié des variétés, dotées d’une bonne compétitivité vis-à-vis des adventices, qui peuvent être recommandées aux paysans.

« Les résultats de ses travaux de recherche sur la résistance des variétés de riz aux adventices parasites seront très utiles pour les programmes de sélection rizicoles » a déclaré Dr Marco Wopereis, Directeur général adjoint charge de la recherche pour le développement, «  si le choix des semences permet aux  producteurs pauvres de  lutter contre les adventices – cela constituera une avancée majeure, car à ce jour,  seules les approches de gestion des cultures sont disponibles pour lutter contre ces adventices ».

Selon les experts d’AfricaRice, les pertes de production rizicole en ASS imputées aux adventices représentent près de la moitié des importations de riz actuelles de la région, et les petits producteurs disposent d'une gamme limitée de technologies efficaces et abordables de gestion des adventices.

Dr Rodenburg supervise de nombreux étudiants en master et en doctorat de diverses origines. De plus, il a constitué un large réseau de partenaires de recherche en Afrique et à travers le globe.  Il est un chercheur prolifique qui contribue également à l’élaboration de supports de formation pour les producteurs telles que les vidéos, les scripts radios et les fiches techniques.

Friday, November 18, 2011

Launch of Africa Rice Agronomy Task Force and Rice Processing and Value Addition Task Force


The Rice Agronomy and Rice Processing and Value Addition Task Forces were launched at AfricaRice temporary headquarters in Cotonou, 15–18 November. The launch workshop was attended by participants from 14 African countries. Issues relating to mechanization are dealt within these two Task Forces.

By end 2011, all of the Task Forces proposed in the Strategic Plan had become operational, with the exception of the Mechanization Task Force, which is expected to become a joint ‘working group’ of the Agronomy and the Processing and Value Addition Task Forces.

Recent research on rice diseases in Africa

The recent dramatic increase in world rice prices drastically affected African countries, which are heavily dependent on rice imports. Consequently, many African countries are trying hard to develop their largely unexploited rice potential to boost domestic production. However, both expansion (the development of new areas) and intensification of rice cultivation will bring new problems, including diseases.


Three main diseases are hampering the effort to intensify rice cultivation in Africa: rice blast (due to pathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae), bacterial blight (caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae) and rice yellow mottle disease (initiated by a Sobemovirus).

 
Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) was first observed in Kenya in the late 1960s. It is now a major disease of rice in the irrigated and lowland ecologies in almost all rice-producing countries in Africa, causing yield losses of 25–100% (depending on the rice variety grown).

For a long time, breeders had access to only one gene for RYMV resistance (rymv1), albeit in four versions — one (rymv1-2) available in an indica variety (Gigante) originating from Mozambique and the others (rymv1-3, rymv1-4 and rymv1-5) in Oryza glaberrima landraces (TOG5681, TOG 5672 and TOG5674, respectively).



These O. glaberrima genes are in several of the Lowland NERICA varieties. Subsequently, a second gene for RYMV resistance was found in O. glaberrima (RYMV2). Unfortunately, there are natural resistance-breaking isolates of the virus. This means that if we release a variety with one of the resistance genes into a hotspot area, the resistance-breaking viruses will survive and multiply, so that the final state is no better than the first!



As an insurance policy against this happening, the AfricaRice breeding strategy is to combine two resistance genes in varieties for release in hotspot areas. This work is being done in collaboration with Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD).


In addition, since it has been shown that the occurrence of resistance-breaking strains is correlated with high disease inoculum, AfricaRice is seeking ways to reduce the disease pressure as a component of an integrated management system to reinforce the durability of the resistance.



Screening for RYMV resistance is conducted in a screenhouse in Cotonou, Benin. The screenhouse is designed to prevent the disease from escaping into the ‘wild’. Segregating populations (the offspring of crosses that are not yet true-breeding) are mechanically inoculated with the virus, and the disease is allowed to run its course.

In addition to visible symptoms, we now have access to three molecular markers for RYMV resistance, which can be detected in the laboratory to show the presence or absence of the resistance gene (or genes) in any particular plant.



Blast disease affects (particularly upland) rice in most parts of the world, inflicting yield losses of 70–80% under disease-favorable conditions. Bacterial blight (BB) has been known in Africa since the late 1970s in the irrigated ecology of the savannah and Sahel regions — yield losses attributable to BB are in the range of 20 to 78% in Southeast Asia and India.


There are several known major resistance genes for each of these diseases (blast resistance: Pi1, Pi2, Pia; BB resistance: Xa1, Xa2, … Xa26), but these are not durable, so new pathogens can emerge and ‘break’ the resistance conferred by these genes. The aim of the AfricaRice breeding program is to combine (pyramid) two or more of these non-durable resistance genes into varieties for farmers.



In addition, some major genes that induce partial durable resistance to blast in Asia (e.g. Pi40) will be tested under African conditions to see if they can be used to protect African rice varieties against blast disease.


The plant pathology laboratory is working in collaboration with the Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Science (JIRCAS) and the Green Super Rice project to determine which resistance genes are best for which populations of the disease — this will indicate the best candidates for pyramiding.


For both diseases, artificial screening of breeding and introduced material will soon be conducted in a climate-controlled greenhouse (expected to be operational in mid-2012).

Les travaux récents sur les maladies du riz en Afrique


L’augmentation spectaculaire récente des prix du riz a considérablement affecté les pays africains qui dépendent fortement des importations de riz. Subséquemment, plusieurs pays africains ne ménagent aucun effort en vue de développer leur potentiel rizicole largement inexploité en vue de relancer la production locale.

Cependant, l’expansion (la mise en valeur de nouvelles superficies) et l’intensification de la riziculture engendreront de nouveaux défis, y compris les maladies.

Les trois principales maladies qui entravent les efforts d’intensification de la riziculture sont les suivantes : La pyriculariose (due au champignon pathogène Magnaporthe oryzae), le flétrissement bactérien (causé par Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae) et le virus de la panachure jaune (causé par un Sobemovirus).

Le virus de la panachure jaune (RYMV) a été découvert au Kenya à la fin des années 1960. Il s’agit d’une principale maladie du riz des écologies irriguées et des bas-fonds dans presque tous les pays producteurs de riz en Afrique. Cette maladie cause des pertes de rendement de l’ordre de 25 % –100 % (selon la variété de riz cultivée).

Pendant longtemps, les sélectionneurs ont eu accès à un seul gène de résistance au RYMV (rymv1), bien qu’en quatre versions : une (rymv1-2) que l’on retrouve chez une variété indica (Gigante) originaire du Mozambique et les autres (rymv1-3, rymv1-4 and rymv1-5) chez les landraces d’Oryza glaberrima (TOG5681, TOG 5672 et TOG5674, respectivement).

On retrouve ces gènes O. glaberrima chez plusieurs variétés de NERICA de bas-fonds. Par conséquent, un second gène de résistance au RYMV a été trouvé chez O. glaberrima (RYMV2).

Malheureusement, il existe des isolats du virus naturellement virulents. Cela signifie que si nous homologuons une variété dotée d’un des gènes de résistance dans une zone à forte prévalence, les virus virulents survivrons et pourront se multiplier, au final nous nous retrouvons donc à la case départ.

Afin de prévenir un tel scénario, la stratégie d’amélioration variétale d’AfricaRice est de combiner deux gènes de résistance chez des variétés en vue de leur homologation dans les zones à forte prévalence. Ces travaux sont menés en collaboration avec l’Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD).

De plus, étant donné qu’il a été démontré que l’occurrence des souches virulentes est corrélée à un inoculum important de la maladie, AfricaRice cherche des moyens de réduire la pression de la maladie dans le cadre d’un volet du système de gestion intégré en vue de renforcer la durabilité de la résistance.

Le criblage pour la résistance au RYMV est mené dans une serre à Cotonou, Bénin qui est conçue pour empêcher la maladie de se transmettre à la nature environnante. Le virus est inoculé mécaniquement aux lignées en disjonction (la descendance des croisements non encore fixés), et la maladie suit son court. Outre les symptômes visibles, nous avons à présent accès à trois marqueurs moléculaires pour la résistance au RYMV, qui peuvent être détectés au laboratoire pour montrer la présence ou l’absence du gène (ou gènes) de résistance chez une plante spécifique.

La Pyriculariose affecte le riz (particulièrement de plateau) dans la plupart des régions du monde, infligeant des pertes de rendements de 70–80 % en conditions favorable à la maladie.

Le Flétrissement bactérien (BB) a été découvert en Afrique depuis la fin des années 1970 dans l’écologie irriguée des régions de la savanne et du Sahel. Les pertes en rendement imputées au BB se situent entre 20 et 78 % en Asie du Sud Est et en Inde. Il existe plusieurs gènes principaux connus de résistance à ces maladies (résistance à la pyriculariose : Pi1, Pi2, Pia; résistance au BB : Xa1, Xa2, …, Xa26), mais ces derniers ne sont pas durables.

Ainsi de nouveaux pathogènes peuvent apparaître et « briser » la résistance conférée par ces gènes. L’objectif du programme d’amélioration variétale d’AfricaRice est de combiner (pyramider) au moins deux de ces gènes de résistance non durables dans des variétés destinées aux producteurs.

Par ailleurs, certains gènes majeurs qui induisent une résistance durable à la pyriculariose en Asie (p. ex. Pi40) seront testés sous conditions africaine pour déterminer s’ils peuvent être utilisés pour protéger les variétés de riz africaines contre la pyriculariose.

Le laboratoire de phytopathologie travaille en collaboration avec le Centre international de recherche pour les sciences agricole du Japon (JIRCAS) et le projet « Green Super Rice » pour déterminer quels gènes de résistance sont les meilleurs et pour quel type de population de maladie – cela indiquera les meilleurs candidats pour le pyramidage.

Pour les deux maladies, le criblage artificiel de sélection et du matériel introduit sera bientôt mené dans une serre en climat contrôlé (qui devra être fonctionnel à la mi-2012).

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

JIRCAS 2011 International Symposium


AfricaRice DDG Marco Wopereis, gave a key note presentation on ‘Realizing Africa’s rice promise’ during the opening of the 2011 JIRCAS International Symposium, ‘Trends of International Rice Research and Japanese Scientific Contribution — Support to GRiSP and CARD’, Tsukuba International Congress Center, Epochal, Convention Hall 200, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan, 14–15 November. The workshop was attended by about 120 people. AfricaRice weed scientist Jonne Rodenburg was awarded the prestigious 2011 Japan International Award for Young Agricultural Researchers for his work on weed science in Africa. He was one of the three awardees, the others being from the Philippines and Bangladesh.  

JIRCAS 2011 International Symposium


AfricaRice DDG Marco Wopereis, gave a keynote presentation on ‘Realizing Africa’s rice promise’ during the opening of the 2011 JIRCAS International Symposium, ‘Trends of International Rice Research and Japanese Scientific Contribution — Support to GRiSP and CARD’, Tsukuba International Congress Center, Epochal, Convention Hall 200, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan, 14–15 November.

The workshop was attended by about 120 people. AfricaRice weed scientist Jonne Rodenburg was awarded the prestigious 2011 Japan International Award for Young Agricultural Researchers for his work on weed science in Africa. He was one of the three awardees, the others being from the Philippines and Bangladesh. 

Monday, October 31, 2011

Africa Food and Nutrition Security Day


AfricaRice was specially invited by the AUC to the 2011 commemoration of the Africa Food and Nutrition Security Day (AFNSD) on 31 October, where the Director General affirmed the Center’s full commitment to the goals of AFNSD in line with the MoU recently signed with AUC. The 2011 AFNSD was organized by the AUC and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and co-hosted by the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia.

AFNSD, which was endorsed by the African Heads of State and Governments during the 15th AU Summit, serves as a rallying point for intensifying commitments at all levels to address the challenges of food and nutrition insecurity, and malnutrition on the continent.



The event was inaugurated by Dr Jean Ping, AUC Chairman. In addition to AUC and NEPAD members, representatives from the Agriculture Ministry of Ethiopia, the Government of Malawi, the European Union, UN agencies, AfricaRice and NGOs attended.

The program included an exhibition of publications, posters and multi-media products. A display by AfricaRice showcased a wide range of rice-based food products.

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Capacity building

Building the capacity of organizations and individuals so that they can carry out their work effectively and efficiently is an integral part of the majority of AfricaRice projects. For many years, the agricultural sector has been under-resourced in sub-Saharan Africa to the point that many national agricultural research systems (NARS) were aging and shrinking, because of the lack of qualified young scientists moving into position as the ‘old guard’ moved on.

To help address the shrinking human-resource base of the NARS, AfricaRice has a long history of collaboration with universities both within and outside its mandate region.

Since the temporary relocation of the Center’s headquarters to Cotonou, Benin, the policy program has developed strong informal linkages with the Faculty of Agronomic Sciences of the University of Abomey-Calavi, also based in Cotonou. Prof. Gauthier Biaou explains that students who want to study rice within the faculty are linked with either AfricaRice or the Institut national de recherches agricoles du Bénin (INRAB). Students involved in this linkage are pursuing either a bachelor’s degree or a postgraduate Diplôme d’études approfondé (DEA, equivalent to a master’s).

For AfricaRice, Aliou Diagne determines the thesis program and is also involved in developing the research protocol with Biaou and the student. Diagne and a lecturer from the faculty supervise the thesis work. “We start between one and three new thesis programs each year with AfricaRice”, Biaou says. Many students gaining their DEA then have the opportunity to take up a six-month placement at AfricaRice for ongoing training, prior to moving on to a PhD program. “Many of our students choose to pursue their PhDs in the USA”, says Biaou.

AfricaRice has similar links with the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, the University of Gaston Berger, Saint-Louis, Senegal, and the University of Lomé, Togo.

AfricaRice model for capacity-building

AfricaRice’s philosophy for capacity-building is intimately linked to its approach to research and development within the region, which is that AfricaRice will empower its NARS (and other) partners to carry out much of the research and all of the development work. Consequently, the model for capacity-building is a combination of the following:

■ AfricaRice does not implement — that is the NARS’ role

■ AfricaRice provides backstopping and training

■ The Center runs an annual training workshop for one to two weeks on policy analysis and impact assessment

■ AfricaRice develops software tools to automate the processing and analysis of survey data collected by the NARS

■ The Center’s Visiting Scientist scheme involves NARS scientists being invited to AfricaRice, which provides tools and training for their work; the scientists analyze their own data and write their own country reports (the time spent at AfricaRice is typically six weeks), while AfricaRice focuses on cross-country comparative analyses and synthesis reports

■ AfricaRice facilitates linkages between universities and NARS to give students ‘real world’ research experience.

Renforcement des capacités

Renforcer les capacités des organisations et des individus afin qu’ils mènent leurs travaux de façon efficace et efficiente fait partie intégrale de la majorité des projets d’AfricaRice. Pendant plusieurs années, le secteur agricole a été sous-financé en Afrique subsaharienne si bien que plusieurs Systèmes nationaux de recherche agricoles (SNRA) ont vieilli et vu leurs effectifs décliner, du fait du manque de jeunes chercheurs qualifiés qui devraient remplacer « la vieille garde » lors de son départ.

En vue d’aborder la question de la diminution des ressources humaines dans les SNRA, AfricaRice possède une longue tradition de collaboration avec les universités à la fois au sein et hors de son mandat géographique. Depuis la délocalisation temporaire du siège du Centre à Cotonou, Bénin, le programme de politique a développé des liens forts informels avec la faculté des sciences agronomiques de l’université d’Abomey-Calavi également située à Cotonou. Prof. Gauthier Biaou explique que les étudiants qui souhaitent travailler sur le riz au sein de la faculté sont soit mis en contact avec AfricaRice, soit avec l’Institut national de recherches agricoles du Bénin (INRAB).

Les étudiants impliqués dans cette collaboration poursuivent une formation en licence ou des études de troisième cycle comme le Diplôme d’études approfondies (DEA). À AfricaRice, Aliou Diagne définit le programme de thèse et est aussi impliqué dans le développement du protocole de recherche avec Biaou et l’étudiant. Diagne ainsi qu’un professeur de la faculté supervisent les travaux de thèse. « Nous avons au début de chaque année entre un et trois programmes de thèse avec AfricaRice », a ajouté Biaou. De nombreux étudiants leur DEA obtenu, ont l’opportunité d’effectuer un stage de six mois à AfricaRice en vue d’être formés avant d’entreprendre des études doctorales. « Un certain nombre de nos étudiants choisissent de poursuivre leurs études aux États-Unis » affirme Biaou.

AfricaRice entretient des relations similaires avec l’Université d’Ibadan, Nigeria, l’Université Gaston Berger, Saint-Louis, Sénégal, et l’Université de Lomé, Togo.

Le modèle de renforcement des capacités d’AfricaRice

La philosophie d’AfricaRice relative au renforcement des capacités est étroitement liée à son approche de recherche et développement dans la région, il s’agit de renforcer les SNRA (et autres partenaires) afin qu’ils puissent mener une grande partie des travaux de recherche et de développement. Par conséquent, le modèle de renforcement des capacités est une combinaison des éléments suivants :


■ AfricaRice ne met pas en oeuvre directement dans les pays – c’est le rôle des SNRA

■ AfricaRice fournit un support technique de même que la formation

■ Le Centre organise tous les ans un atelier de formation d’une ou deux semaines sur l’analyse des politiques et l’évaluation d’impact

■ AfricaRice met au point des outils logiciels en vue d’automatiser le traitement et l’analyse de données collectées par les SNRA

■ Le programme de chercheur-visiteur du Centre implique les chercheurs des SNRA, il a pour objectif de les former et de les outiller pour leurs travaux ; les chercheurs analysent leurs propres données et élaborent eux-mêmes les rapports de leurs pays (ils restent généralement six semaines à AfricaRice), alors qu’AfricaRice se focalise sur les analyses comparées entre pays et les rapports de synthèse

■ AfricaRice facilite les liens entre les universités et les SNRA en vue d’offrir aux étudiants une « expérience réelle » dans le monde de la recherche.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Rice experts in Africa adopt a new way of doing business for greater impact

As part of a global program on rice science that has laid out concrete and quantifiable key impacts to benefit the poor, the hungry, and the environment in the next 25 years, rice experts in Africa have adopted a more interdisciplinary and product-oriented approach in order to deliver greater development impacts.

The innovative program known as the Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP) aims to mobilize the very best of the world’s rice science and involve the widest range of stakeholders possible in the technology generation and dissemination process to address, among others, Africa’s major rice development challenges.

“We acknowledge the urgency to conduct research activities differently – to do more and to do better, given the increasing poverty throughout the world,” stated AfricaRice Director General Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck. “GRiSP proposes a new global approach to research and we are part of this program.”

Laying emphasis on the need for pooling intelligence to better exploit the comparative advantages of all the partners to address more efficiently the constraints to rice production, Dr. Seck spelt out 10 conditions that are essential for GRiSP to become a successful program and ensure a high degree of satisfaction among rice farmers and consumers throughout the world.

The conditions include the need to respect the diversity of partnerships, regional differences and institutional identities in the GRiSP, while rejecting “hegemonic thinking.” “It is only the synthesis of these differences that will make us move forward,” Dr. Seck said at the recent GRiSP-Africa Science Forum held at AfricaRice in Cotonou, Benin.

The conditions also specify the need for equitable resource allocation based on the real requirements of the various regions; the urgency to strengthen the capacity of African stakeholders; the significant role of the national partners within the GRiSP; the importance of continuous dialog with policy-makers; and the need to avoid bureaucracy as well as excessive evaluation where scientists spend more time writing reports than doing research.

The GRiSP-Africa Science Forum, which was attended by over 100 international and national rice experts, including representatives of all the key partners, reviewed the progress made by GRiSP in Africa in 2011. The results focused on the development of new research products – ranging from gene discovery to small combine harvesters and policy briefs for decision-makers – grouped under six GRiSP themes.

“We saw some exciting progress in marker-assisted selection (MAS) work on resistance to rice diseases and pests and salinity. This work is very valuable in the context of the changing climate in the continent,” said AfricaRice Deputy Director General & Director of Research for Development Dr. Marco Wopereis.

“This research activity involves many experts, not only from AfricaRice and its national and regional partners, but also from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), the French Research Institute for Development (IRD), the Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS) and other advanced research institutes. It is therefore an excellent example of how GRiSP works as it helps leverage global expertise to solve Africa’s rice problems.”

Dr. Marco Wopereis also highlighted the major shift in focus from supply-driven research where the emphasis is mainly on increasing rice production to more demand- or market-driven research, where the attention is given to the entire rice value chain.

Launched in November 2010, GRiSP is the first CGIAR Research Program (CRP) to be approved. It operates under the overall leadership of IRRI, which also oversees the activities in Asia; AfricaRice is leading the work in Africa, and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in the Latin America & Caribbean region.

The French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD), IRD and JIRCAS are playing a strategic role in GRiSP, with hundreds of other partners worldwide representing governments, the private sector, farmers’ organizations and civil society.

Dr. Achim Dobermann, IRRI Deputy Director General for Research & GRiSP Program Director, who took an active part in the GRiSP-Africa Science Forum, expressed his satisfaction with the progress made by the Africa-based team in 2011, particularly with regard to the new way of doing research.

“We live in a globalized world and we can move much faster if we can learn from each other and incorporate that knowledge into our own thinking. And this learning goes in all directions – from Asia to Africa, from Africa to Asia, from Africa to Latin America and so on,” Dr. Dobermann explained.

In his capacity as the outgoing Chair of the AfricaRice National Experts Committee, Dr. Babou Jobe, Director General of the National Agriculture Research Institute, The Gambia, confirmed “100 percent support” to GRiSP, particularly its major thrust on strengthening national capacity. He was pleased to learn that one third of the Global Rice Science Scholarships had gone to African students in 2011.


Related links


Documents :


GRiSP: Ten Essential Conditions for Success by Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck, Director General, AfricaRice


Dix conditions essentielles pour la réussite du GRiSP Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck, Directeur général, AfricaRice



Photos :


Scenes from the GRiSP-Africa Science Forum


Videos :


GRiSP Program Director Dr Achim Dobermann (IRRI Deputy Director General for Research) sharing his observations about the 2011 GRiSP-Africa Science Forum with participants.


Dr Marco Wopereis, Deputy Director General and Director of Research for Development, AfricaRice, summarizing the 2-day sessions of 2011 GRiSP-Africa Science Forum


AfricaRice Director General Dr Papa Abdoulaye Seck speaking at the inaugural session of 2011 GRiSP-Africa Science Forum, held at AfricaRice, Cotonou, Benin, 13-14 September 2011.


Les experts riz d’Afrique adoptent une nouvelle façon de faire les choses en vue d’un impact plus grand

Dans le cadre d’un programme mondial sur la science rizicole qui s’est fixé pour objectif d’avoir d’importants impacts concrets et quantifiables susceptibles de profiter aux pauvres, aux affamés et à l’environnement au cours des 25 prochaines années, les chercheurs riz d’Afrique ont adopté des approches de recherche interdisciplinaire finalisée en vue d’un impact plus grand.

Le programme innovateur connu sous le nom de Partenariat mondial de la science rizicole (GRiSP) vise à mobiliser la meilleure science rizicole dans le monde et à impliquer la plus vaste gamme possible d’acteurs dans le processus de génération et de diffusion des innovations technologiques pour faire face, entre autres, aux principaux défis du développement rizicole en Afrique.

« Nous reconnaissons l’urgence de faire de la recherche autrement, de faire plus et de faire mieux, compte tenu de l’aggravation de la pauvreté à travers le monde », a déclaré le Directeur général d’AfricaRice, Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck. « Le GRiSP impose un nouveau décor au niveau mondial et nous sommes partie prenante de ce dispositif. »

Soulignant la nécessité de mutualisation des intelligences pour mieux exploiter les avantages comparatifs de tous les partenaires en vue de faire face plus efficacement aux contraintes de la production rizicole, Dr. Seck a expliqué clairement 10 conditions essentielles qui doivent être réunies pour que le GRiSP puisse connaître un succès retentissant au grand bonheur des riziculteurs et des consommateurs du monde entier.

Ces conditions incluent la nécessité de respecter la diversité des partenariats, les différences régionales et les identités institutionnelles au sein du GRiSP, tout en excluant « toute pensée hégémonique ». « C’est seulement la synthèse de ces différences qui nous permettra d’aller de l’avant, » a déclaré Dr. Seck au récent Forum scientifique GRiSP-Afrique tenu à AfricaRice à Cotonou, Bénin.

Les conditions spécifient aussi la nécessité de la répartition équitable des ressources en fonction des besoins réels des différentes régions, l’urgence de renforcer la capacité des acteurs africains, le rôle important des partenaires nationaux dans le GRiSP ; l’importance du dialogue continu avec les décideurs politiques ; et la nécessité d’éviter aussi bien la bureaucratie que les surévaluations « où les chercheurs passent beaucoup plus de temps à préparer leurs dossiers d’évaluation qu’à faire de la recherche ».

Le forum scientifique GRiSP-Afrique, auquel ont pris part plus de 100 experts riz internationaux et nationaux, y compris des représentants de tous les partenaires clés, a examiné le progrès que le GRiSP a fait en Afrique en 2011. Les résultats ont porté sur le développement de nouveaux produits de recherche – qui vont de la découverte du gène aux petites moissonneuses combinées et aux brèves politiques pour les décideurs politiques – groupés sous six thèmes du GRiSP.

« Nous avons vu un progrès remarquable dans le travail de sélection assistée par marqueurs (SAM) sur la résistance aux maladies et aux ravageurs du riz et à la salinité. Ce travail est très utile dans le contexte du changement climatique sur le continent, » a déclaré Dr. Marco Wopereis, Directeur général adjoint et Directeur de la recherche pour le développement à AfricaRice.

« Cette activité de recherche implique beaucoup d’experts, non seulement d’AfricaRice et de ses partenaires nationaux et régionaux, mais aussi de l’Institut international de recherche sur le riz (IRRI), de l’Institut français de recherche pour le développement (IRD), du Centre japonais de recherche international pour les sciences agricoles (JIRCAS) et d’autres instituts de recherche avancée. C’est donc un excellent exemple de la façon dont le GRiSP fonctionne puisqu’il aide à orienter l’expertise mondiale pour résoudre les problèmes de la riziculture en Afrique. »

Dr Marco Wopereis a aussi mis en exergue le changement majeur de l’objectif en passant de la recherche axée sur l’approvisionnement où l’accent est mis principalement sur l’augmentation de la production rizicole à la recherche axée plus sur la demande ou le marché, où on accorde l’attention à l’ensemble de la chaîne de valeur.

Lancé en novembre 2010, le GRiSP est le premier programme de recherche (CRP) du GCRAI à être approuvé. Il fonctionne sous le leadership global de l’IRRI, qui supervise aussi les activités en Asie ; AfricaRice dirige le travail en Afrique, et le Centre international d’agriculture tropicale (CIAT) en Amérique latine et dans la région des Caraïbes.

Le Centre français de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD), l’IRD et JIRCAS jouent un rôle stratégique dans le GRiSP, avec des centaines d’autres partenaires à travers le monde représentant les gouvernements, le secteur privé, les organisations paysannes et la société civile.

Dr. Achim Dobermann, Directeur général adjoint chargé de la recherche à l’IRRI et Directeur du Programme du GRiSP, qui a joué un rôle actif dans le Forum scientifique GRiSP-Afrique, a exprimé sa satisfaction par rapport au progrès fait en 2011 par l’équipe basée en Afrique, notamment la nouvelle façon de faire la recherche.

« Nous vivons dans un monde globalisé et nous pouvons aller plus vite si nous pouvons apprendre les uns des autres et incorporer cette connaissance dans notre pensée. Et cet apprentissage va dans toutes les directions – de l’Asie à l’Afrique, de l’Afrique à l’Asie, de l’Afrique à l’Amérique latine et ainsi de suite, » a expliqué Dr. Dobermann.

En sa capacité de président sortant du Comité des experts nationaux d’AfricaRice, Dr. Babou Jobe, Directeur général de l’Institut national de recherche agricole de la Gambie, a confirmé le « soutien à 100 pour cent » au GRiSP, notamment son objectif central sur le renforcement des capacités nationales. Il était heureux d’apprendre qu’un tiers des bourses du Partenariat mondial de la science rizicole était alloué à des étudiants africains en 2011.



Liens utiles



Documents :



GRiSP: Ten Essential Conditions for Success by Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck, Director General, AfricaRice



Dix conditions essentielles pour la réussite du GRiSP Dr. Papa Abdoulaye Seck, Directeur général, AfricaRice



Photos :



Scenes from the GRiSP-Africa Science Forum



Vidéos :



GRiSP Program Director Dr Achim Dobermann (IRRI Deputy Director General for Research) sharing his observations about the 2011 GRiSP-Africa Science Forum with participants.



Dr Marco Wopereis, Deputy Director General and Director of Research for Development, AfricaRice, summarizing the 2-day sessions of 2011 GRiSP-Africa Science Forum



AfricaRice Director General Dr Papa Abdoulaye Seck speaking at the inaugural session of 2011 GRiSP-Africa Science Forum, held at AfricaRice, Cotonou, Benin, 13-14 September 2011.







Monday, September 26, 2011

Rice policy workshop

A workshop on the ‘Competitiveness of rice value chains after the rice crisis: Lessons from case studies’ was organized, on 25–26 September, as a side event after the 40th anniversary celebration in Banjul. Eighteen participants attended — representatives of national agricultural research programs and national statistical services from 11 countries, private sector, the African Union and AfricaRice.

The results presented by the various countries showed that, in general, local rice production systems are competitive and they make efficient use of domestic resources. But, in terms of incentives, not all the rice systems benefit from protection. In general, it is the upland rice ecology that seems to have higher domestic resource cost (DRC), showing that upland rice systems need more efficient technologies to boost performance.

Saturday, September 24, 2011

AfricaRice 40th anniversary celebration

To coincide with the CoM, the Center’s 40th anniversary was celebrated in Banjul, Gambia on 24 September, under the theme ‘40 years of rice research at the service of Africa’. It was fitting that the anniversary was commemorated in Gambia — one of the founding members of the Association and one of the main supporters of local rice on the continent.

AfricaRice’s celebration was inaugurated by the Minister of Trade of Gambia in the presence of the outgoing and incoming CoM chairmen, other representatives of the CoM, members of the diplomatic corps and donor community, national and international researchers, development partners, the private sector and farmers’ organizations.

At the inauguration, the farsightedness of the founding members of the Association was praised, the main achievements of the Association despite all the problems it has faced over the 40 years were highlighted, and the dedicated contribution of past and present management, staff and partners, including donors, was gratefully acknowledged.



The second half of the program, which was chaired by the AfricaRice Board Chairman, included a keynote address on ‘Fostering small-scale rice production for food’, by Josué Dioné, Director of Food Security and Sustainable Development at UNECA. In his address, Dr Dione emphasized that fostering small-scale rice production requires the adoption of a regionally coordinated value-chain approach to investing in technologies, infrastructure, institutions and policies.

As part of the celebration program, Dr Dione officially released the AfricaRice book Lessons from the Rice Crisis: Policies for a food secure Africa, which was published for the occasion. The book describes how the policy research and advocacy conducted by AfricaRice immediately before and during the 2008 rice crisis were influential in providing adequate information and options.

The program also included a panel discussion on ‘Investments in small-scale rice value chains: Challenges and opportunities’. The panelists represented the entire range of the rice value chains, bringing attention to the need for a holistic approach to the rice sector, taking into account the needs and priorities of all the actors of the value chain.

Friday, September 23, 2011

28th Ordinary Session of the Council of Ministers


The 28th Ordinary Session of the AfricaRice Council of Ministers (CoM) was held in Banjul chaired by Gambia, on 22 and 23 September. The opening message of the President of Gambia, delivered by the Secretary General, recognized that AfricaRice has been relentless in its advocacy for support to the rice sector in sub-Saharan Africa.

Recognizing that international public goods, such as improved varieties, crop management options and evidence-based policy recommendations, generated by AfricaRice and its partners have contributed significantly to boosting the rice sector in sub-Saharan Africa, the CoM encouraged non-member countries in Africa that are benefiting from these goods to join the Association.[1]



The Council gave its full support to GRiSP, approved the Center’s new Strategic Plan for 2011-2020, and asked the Center to develop an operational plan as soon as possible to be implemented in collaboration with national partners. After reviewing the research and development activities of the Center over the previous 5 years, the Council commended the efforts of the Director General and staff.

At the end of the Session, the Council made 10 key resolutions and approved Chad’s assumption as Chair of the Council for the next 2 years.



[1] Africa Rice Center was established as the West Africa Rice Development Association in 1971, and the inter-governmental Association remains at the heart of the Center, a feature that distinguishes AfricaRice from all other CGIAR centers.

Friday, September 16, 2011

AfricaRice Science Week and GRiSP-Africa Science Forum


GRiSP aims to mobilize the very best of the world’s rice science and involve the widest possible range of stakeholders in the technology generation and dissemination process to address, among others, Africa’s major rice-development challenges.

The GRiSP-Africa Science Forum, held at AfricaRice’s temporary headquarters in Cotonou, from 12 to 16 September, was attended by over 100 international and national rice experts, including representatives of all the key partners. Participants reviewed the progress made by GRiSP in Africa in 2011, particularly on the development of new research products — ranging from gene discovery[1] to the mini-combine[2] and policy briefs for decision-makers — grouped under the six GRiSP themes:

  •       Harnessing genetic diversity to chart new productivity, quality and health horizons
  •       Accelerating the development, delivery and adoption of improved rice varieties
  •       Increasing the productivity, sustainability and resilience of rice-based production systems
  •       Extracting more value through improved quality, processing, market systems and new products
  •       Technology evaluations, targeting and policy options for enhanced impact
  •       Supporting the growth of the global rice sector.





Laying emphasis on the need for pooling intelligence to better exploit the comparative advantages of all the partners to more efficiently address the constraints to rice production, AfricaRice Director General Dr Seck spelled out 10 conditions that are essential for GRiSP to become a successful program and ensure a high degree of satisfaction among rice farmers and consumers throughout the world.



The conditions include the need to respect the diversity of partnerships, regional differences and institutional identities in GRiSP, while rejecting ‘hegemonic thinking’. The conditions also include the need for equitable resource allocation based on the real requirements of the various regions; the urgent need to strengthen the capacity of African stakeholders; the significant role of the national partners within GRiSP; the importance of continuous dialog with policy-makers; and the need to avoid bureaucracy, including excessive evaluation with scientists spending more time writing reports than doing research.

AfricaRice Deputy Director General (DDG) and Director of Research for Development, Marco Wopereis highlighted the major shift in focus from supply-driven research, where the emphasis is mainly on increasing rice production, to more demand- or market-driven research, where the attention is given to the entire rice value chain.

Achim Dobermann, IRRI Deputy Director General for Research and GRiSP Program Director, took an active part in the GRiSP-Africa Science Forum, expressing his satisfaction with the progress made by the Africa-based team in 2011, particularly with regard to the new way of doing research.

In his capacity as outgoing chairman of the AfricaRice National Experts Committee, Babou Jobe (Director General of the National Agriculture Research Institute, Gambia) confirmed “100% support” to GRiSP, particularly its major thrust on strengthening national capacity. He was pleased to learn that one-third of the Global Rice Science Scholarships had gone to African students in 2011.






[1] See ‘The genes that could beat the “AIDS of rice”’ in the GRiSP Annual Report 2011.
[2] See ‘Research in brief: Promoting small-scale mechanization across the continent as the essential ingredient for rice intensification’ in this report and ‘A mini-combine for sub-Saharan Africa’ in the GRiSP Annual Report 2011.